11 Best Dryland Training For Swimmers

Updated on: November 2020

Best Dryland Training For Swimmers in 2020


Swimming Anatomy

Swimming Anatomy
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020

How To Dryland Train For Swimming: Your Step-By-Step Guide To Dryland Training For Swimmers

How To Dryland Train For Swimming: Your Step-By-Step Guide To Dryland Training For Swimmers
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020

Complete Conditioning for Swimming (Complete Conditioning for Sports)

Complete Conditioning for Swimming (Complete Conditioning for Sports)
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020
  • Exercises and drills for each stroke
  • Event-based workouts and programs
  • Dryland training
  • Tapering for peak performance
  • Year-round conditioning plans
  • Nutrition before, during, and after swim meets

How To Dryland Train For Swimming: Your Step-By-Step Guide To Dryland Training For Swimmers by HowExpert Press (2016-01-13)

How To Dryland Train For Swimming: Your Step-By-Step Guide To Dryland Training For Swimmers by HowExpert Press (2016-01-13)
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020

Championship Swim Training

Championship Swim Training
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020
  • Part I, Technique Drills and Sets, deals with training zones and benchmark sets so critical to effective training and goal setting. Also included is a series of drill progressions and checklists that can be applied to each stroke and the individual medley. These progressions will help pinpoint stroke deficiencies and improve stroke technique as well as sculling, starts, turns, finishes, and kick and pull training. The checklists give swimmers and coaches tips for training and competition.
  • Part II, Workouts and Programs, is full of information for coaches to plan the long-term development of juniors through masters swimmers. Sample training sets are provided and can be customized to suit the level of that swimmer or squad. Part II also covers the critical tapering phase to get swimmers ready for competition and provides detailed racing strategies. Dryland conditioning suggestions help swimmers train all year round, whether in or out of the water. And no world-class coaching book would be complete without a chapter on how to completely and objectively evaluate your training program.

Dry-land ergometry in physiological assessment of swimmers: Methodological advances and training applications

Dry-land ergometry in physiological assessment of swimmers: Methodological advances and training applications
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020

The 100 Best Swimming Drills

The 100 Best Swimming Drills
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020
  • Array

[Swimming Anatomy: Your Illustrated Guide for Swimming Strength, Speed and Endurance] [Author: Ian McLeod] [April, 2010]

[Swimming Anatomy: Your Illustrated Guide for Swimming Strength, Speed and Endurance] [Author: Ian McLeod] [April, 2010]
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020

Triathlon Anatomy

Triathlon Anatomy
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020
  • Array

FINIS Dryland Stretch Cord (Light, Yellow)

FINIS Dryland Stretch Cord (Light, Yellow)
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020
  • Workout Outside the Pool
  • Full Body Workout
  • Resistance training increases stroke range
  • Easy way to combat injury by building specific muscle strength
  • Three Resistance Levels- Yellow Webbing - Light Resistance

StretchCordz with Paddles, Green

StretchCordz with Paddles, Green
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2020
  • Includes two paddles connected to two 4ft/1.2 m tubes and a combination mounting loop
  • No removable components or replacement parts
  • Available in five resistance levels
  • Trains swimmers to keep hands flat while opposing every movement to increase strength and ultimately speed
  • Used by the United States Olympic Swim Team

Swim Training Tips for Active Women

It is easy to incorporate swim training into a regular routine.

1. See Your Doctor.

Especially if you are over-weight or over 30, it is important to have a physical to make sure there won't be a problem adding a new stressor on the body.

2. Have Goals

Start with a short and a long term goal. If you can only swim one lap of the pool without stopping; start with that, and gradually increase it to 100 yards. After that set 200 yards. Possibly you could make a mile your long term. It is not so much what your goals are. The important thing is to have them.

3. Imitate Others

While watching others swimming in the pool, you will notice that some of them just seem to glide. Watch them to see how they do it. You will notice that they have a very definite technique.

4. Use Swim Aids

This is especially important if you are just beginning a work-out program. You will tire quite easily at first, and you will want to stay in the water as long as you can. You can do this with the help of swimming aids. When I first added swimming to my work-out routine, I got pretty tired after one lap, but I didn't want to quit. One of the other ladies there with me, showed me the closet where they kept the swim aids. With the use of a small board placed under my abdomen, I was able to continue swimming for another couple of laps without injuring, or endangering myself.

5. Be Relaxed

If you do not need a particular muscle while swimming; don't use it. I love to swim, and I do it as often as I can. I do have one particular problem; I hate for my face to be under the water. Before I know it, my neck and upper shoulders starts aching. If you have goals with your swimming it is important that you relax.

6. Learn Different Strokes

As with all exercises, the stroke that is easiest is the one you will stick with. If your goal is speed or distance, then this is okay. Just push yourself a little farther each week. But if your goal is fitness you will need to use other strokes to avoid hitting a plateau like in other exercise programs.

7. Have a Work-out Partner

When I first added swimming to my work-outs, was when a friend of mine asked me to go with her to the pool. She wanted to start swimming laps but didn't want to go to the pool by herself; so I went with her. I'm really glad I did. It has been a lot of fun for the both of us.

8. Have a Work-out Plan

Unless they have a coach, swimmers very often do their own plan, as they know what they want to achieve. My friend and I use the same plan since we work out together.

We swim three mornings a week as follows:

Monday - we concentrate on distance. We have one hour to swim just as far as we can possibly go, so we stay relaxed and do our laps. We don't compete. We just swim side by side and when one gets tired we just flip over on our backs and swim until rested.

Wednesday - we do different strokes intermittently. We decide which two we want to do on that day - a very short rest - and reverse the order. Using the different strokes does seem to help the hour go by fast.

Friday - our speed day. We don't concentrate on racing because neither one of us is very competitive, but we do try to swim our fastest ever; every Friday.

9. Vary Your Work-out Plan

If you are starting to get a little bored, or you just want to try something different. Take a water aerobics class. They're a lot of fun, and you meet other people with the same interests as you.

10. Try a Competition

Our county every year has a triathlon for charity. People from all over compete in this. It could be just what you need for a quick jump-start.

There is no better way to work out and have fun too, than with swimming. It uses all your major muscle groups in one work-out session.

Related Bestselling Lists That You Might Like