11 Best Swim Discs

Updated on: January 2021

Best Swim Discs in 2021


Makone Kids Arm Float Discs, Swim Arm Brand Set Swimming Armbands for Pool (6 pcs/Set)

Makone Kids Arm Float Discs, Swim Arm Brand Set Swimming Armbands for Pool (6 pcs/Set)
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2021
  • ➤◖Safety Assurance◗: Maximum User Bearing of 60 KG in the water as well as no need with inflating design is the better and safer assurance for baby to learning swimming.
  • ➤◖High-quality Material◗: Made of EVA foal material. Makone Swimming Arm Ring won’t chip or absorb water, which is safer than the traditional inflatable swimming armbands.
  • ➤◖Widely Used◗: Simple and easy-to-use. Makone Float Ring is perfect for all the babies or kids who are the beginners of swimming and whose arm circumference are under 16 cm/6.3 inches.
  • ➤◖Main Information◗: Single Diameter: 18.5 cm/7.3 inch; Single Thickness: 2.3cm/ 0.9 inch; Come with Three Colors : Blue, Red, Yellow (2 pcs for each color)
  • ➤◖What Can You Get◗: Definite 100% Refund or New Replacement warranty for logistics damages; Better and safer swimming assistant tools for our baby! Wonderful service for you!

Kiefer Water Exercise Discs with 7.5-Inch in Diameter (1-Pair), Blue

Kiefer Water Exercise Discs with 7.5-Inch in Diameter (1-Pair), Blue
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2021
  • 7.5 inch easy grip hand bells offer simple underwater resistance
  • Great choice for those with arthritic hands or limited mobility that have trouble holding a standard dumbbell
  • Ideal for aquatic exercise, aqua aerobics, or aquatic therapy
  • Soft and buoyant premier quality foam
  • 7.5 inches in diameter

Delphin Swim DISC Band

Delphin Swim DISC Band
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2021
  • Delphin Arm Bands
  • 1-SIZE

Kids Swimming Training Tool, FTXJ 6Pcs EVA Foam Swim Arm Bands Floats Discs Tube Armlets for Children

Kids Swimming Training Tool, FTXJ 6Pcs EVA Foam Swim Arm Bands Floats Discs Tube Armlets for Children
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2021
  • We don't offer the choice of color and style,we will send the product at random,hope you can understand
  • Material: EVA Foam
  • Size:Approx 186x22mm
  • Great for use as a swimming aid, although this should not be used a lifesaving device.
  • Awesome for kids learning to swim, safe, practical and very comfortable for the child.

Zoggs Kids Float Discs Learn To Swim Arm Band

Zoggs Kids Float Discs Learn To Swim Arm Band
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2021
  • Durable puncture free floats
  • Remove one disc at a time as confidence grows
  • Made from foam
  • Suitable for ages 2-6 years - max weight 25 kg
  • Includes four discs

Speedo Kids Begin to Swim Fabric Arm Bands, Sapphire Blue, One Size

Speedo Kids Begin to Swim Fabric Arm Bands, Sapphire Blue, One Size
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2021
  • Dual chamber heavy duty inflatable arm band for added safety and durability
  • Soft polyester material provides added comfort
  • Great for helping young swimmers build confidence in the water
  • High visibility, bright inner fabric for increased pool safety
  • One size: 2-12 years/max weight 110 lbs.

Arena Poolish Moulded Swim Cap, Disc Record Gold

Arena Poolish Moulded Swim Cap, Disc Record Gold
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2021
  • Designed for ultimate pool style and fun
  • Made with a soft silicone for extra comfort and fit
  • Multi-colors & designs featuring Arena lettering and logo
  • 100% silicone

2 Pcs Foam Swimming Aquatic Cuffs Fitness Exercise Workout Ankles Arms Belts with Quick Release Buckle Swim Fitness Training Floats Sleeves Kids Float Discs Swim Ankle Bands Water Aerobics Float Ring

2 Pcs Foam Swimming Aquatic Cuffs Fitness Exercise Workout Ankles Arms Belts with Quick Release Buckle Swim Fitness Training Floats Sleeves Kids Float Discs Swim Ankle Bands Water Aerobics Float Ring
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2021
  • These ankles arms belts that perfect for swimmers with limited finger control and strength are a solution to maintain the body in alignment while in water
  • Multifunctional swimming helper,can be used to suspend ankles, legs, wrists and arms during aquatic therapy
  • Fitness exercise set swim float discs paired is more easier adjustment, equipped with buckle closure, more convenient to wear according to your arm or ankle size
  • EPS foam material: Not chip, break or absorbed by water
  • Inner circumference size: From 11 to 13 inches

Trademark Innovations Water Weight Exercise Equipment Hand Held Disc Set for Pool Water Aerobics

Trademark Innovations Water Weight Exercise Equipment Hand Held Disc Set for Pool Water Aerobics
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2021
  • Each hand held disc is 7" in diameter
  • Popular for water aerobics and water exercise
  • Easy grip holes for those with limited mobility or arthritic hands
  • Warning: Not to be used as a flotation device
  • By Trademark Innovations

6 Pack EVA Foam Swim Discs Armbands Floating Sleeves,Pool Float Board Baby Swimming Exercises Circles Rings

6 Pack EVA Foam Swim Discs Armbands Floating Sleeves,Pool Float Board Baby Swimming Exercises Circles Rings
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2021
  • 1.Foam swim disc swimming aid offering an exciting alternative to inflatable arm bands.
  • 2. Can be worn collectively, removing discs one at a time as confidence and ability increases.Light weight and easy to carry.
  • 3.Very helpful and great fun item for children swimming assistance,encourages child to move and relax in the water.
  • 4.Light weight and easy to carry.
  • 5.Awesome for kids learning to swim, safe, practical and very comfortable for the child.

SANGDA Swim Arm Band Set,Swim Belt,Kids Float Discs,EVA Foam Swim Aquatic Cuffs,Ankles Arms Belts with Quick Release Buckle for Swim Fitness Training,2pcs

SANGDA Swim Arm Band Set,Swim Belt,Kids Float Discs,EVA Foam Swim Aquatic Cuffs,Ankles Arms Belts with Quick Release Buckle for Swim Fitness Training,2pcs
BESTSELLER NO. 11 in 2021
  • ❤ HIGH QUALITY MATERIAL ❤ Foam Material,Not chip, break or absorbed by water. Swimming aquatic cuffs are wonderful nice for you due to its superior quality and nonabsorbent feature.
  • ❤ EASY TO ADJUST ❤ The quick release buckle allows you to wear or take off the aquatic cuffs ultra conveniently. Easier adjustment, more convenient to wear according to your arm or ankle size.
  • ❤ HIGH QUALITY FUNCTION ❤ Moderate and resistive device Perfect for ankles or arms Multifunctional swimming helper Can be used to suspend ankles, legs, wrists and arms during aquatic therapy
  • ❤ WIDELY SUITABLE ❤ common swimming, beach swimming, swimming classes, etc. Warning: not to be used as a flotation device. For ages 14+
  • ❤ FUNCTION ❤ Moderate and resistive device Perfect for ankles or arms Multifunctional swimming helper Can be used to suspend ankles, legs, wrists and arms during aquatic therapy

Swimming One-Stop Shop

A brief research paper outlining the history of swimming as well as incorporating a guide to perform all four strokes of modern competitive swimming.

The earliest proof of humans swimming dates back to 9,000 B.C. with cave drawings found in the Middle East (Tarpinian 2). In Ancient Greece and Rome, swimming was used for military training as well as a leisure activity for the well-to-do (Tarpinian 2). Native Americans were the first to be documented by the western world in 1739 to use the superior "crawl" form of swimming, or modernly, better known as the freestyle; however, it was dismissed by the English as "grotesque splashing" (Colwin 14). At this time, the English were using a breast-style stroke, which is not nearly as effective as the crawl stroke (Colwin 14). More than a century later, an English lad named J. Trudgen, after visiting Buenos Aires in 1863, incorrectly copied the Native American stroke and introduced it in England as the trudgen stroke (Colwin10). This stroke was very tiring and most swimmers could not even go 200 yards without wearing out because the stroke lacked continuity and a breathing technique (Colwin 10, 16). After decades of improving th stroke, the trudgen stroke eventually evolved into the crawl stoke, which the Native Americans had already developed (Colwin 14). After pools started to be constructed for a competitive swimming nature, swimming became an Olympic sport in the 1896 Olympics at Athens ("Swimming" MedicineNet). After some time, women were finally allowed to compete in the sport in the 1912 Olympic Games ("Swimming" Columbia). Since then, the four basic strokes have been set and constantly improved by the angle of the hands, elbow and head while performing the stroke.

The most popular and easiest stroke to perform is the freestyle stroke (Tarpinian 3). Freestyle is performed by an alteration of the arm cycles and a flutter kick of the legs while lying on your belly. As in all the swimming strokes, breathing is accomplished by breathing in through the mouth and out through the nose unlike all other sports (Colwin 17). In every stroke, the water line needs to cut the swimmer in half, from the top of the head to the arch of the foot (Colwin 17). On every stroke there is also a pull and a recovery. A pull is when the arm is in the water completing the stroke. A recovery is when the arm is out of the water starting the stroke. In freestyle, the pull needs to make an "S" shape down the body, and the thumb needs to brush the middle thigh to start the recovery ("Swimming" MedicineNet). At the beginning of the pull, the arm needs to be straight as the swimmer pulls downward, then bends the elbow once the pull reaches the vertical line from the chest, and the arm tucks under the body continuing the S pattern (Colwin 17). As the thumb brushes past the middle thigh, and the arm comes out of the water, the swimmer has started the recovery. In the transition between the pull and recovery, the hand will release the pull hand position and essentially round off to begin the recovery starting hand position (Tarpinian 14). In freestyle, the recovery has the hand come completely out of the water keeping the elbow high with a relaxed arm. During this point, it is the optimal time to breathe. For serious swimmers, the hand will make an air bubble as it comes across the mouth, and the swimmer will turn his head to the side and take a breath (Colwin 92). The hand needs to enter the water about a foot in front of your shoulder at a 45* angle with an ulnar flexion of the wrist (Colwin 103). Once the hand enters the water, extend the shoulder forward and rotate the body to get the maximum length of stroke (Tarpinian 11). When kicking, the toes need to be pointed and pigeon-toed, and the knees need to be slightly bent while the legs move from the hip (Colwin 17). The majority of the kick, both the upbeat and the downbeat, take place underwater but no more than half a foot (Tarpinian 21). Most people think that big kicks make you go faster, but the most effective kick is a small one because too large a kick takes the body out of streamline and creates too much drag in the water (Tarpinian 21). Charles M. Daniels, the first American Olympic Swimming Gold Medal Winner, created the use of the 6-beat kick or 6 kicks per arm cycle; it is more commonly used by advanced swimmers than amateur swimmers because they use the easier 2-beat kick or 2 kicks per arm cycle (Colwin 18). The Japanese were the first to harness the power of efficiency through a longer stroke at a higher tempo, but the Western World dismissed it as it would only benefit their kind: short stature, short arms and strong legs (Colwin 22). Nevertheless, today that is what competitive swimmers use to get better at all the strokes; its better known term is "distance per stroke" (Colwin 22).

The backstroke is exactly like the freestyle except that you are in fact on your back. The only major difference is that the pull starts with the pinky entering the water first at 10 o'clock with the same ulnar flexion of the wrist (Colwin 25). The pull still incorporates the S shape, the extension of the shoulder, the rotation of the body and passage of the thumb by the mid thigh. The recovery starts with a straight arm coming out of the water; then the elbow slightly bends as the hand rotates to where the pinky finger is able to enter the water first (Colwin 25). There is still a flutter kick but the swimmer has to adapt to a slight change of ratio in force exerted by the backs and fronts of his legs (Tarpinian 8). The backstroke and the freestyle are the easiest of the four to learn how to do correctly. The two more difficult strokes to perform are the breaststroke and the butterfly.

The breaststroke is actually the first stroke humans came up with other than the doggie paddle (Colwin 4). It allows less effort in rough waters and enables the head to stay out of the water (Tarpinian 58). However, it is a complex stroke to achieve speed. The legs do a frog kick while the arms thrust forwards and come around and back up to the chest (Tarpinian 58). The Japanese actually found they could swim faster doing the breaststroke underwater, so in 1957 the Olympic rules changed to disqualify more than one pull and one stroke underwater (Tarpinian 59). The breaststroke relies a great deal on propulsion from the legs, so if the swimmer has long legs, he should reduce the width of his kick while a swimmer with shorter legs should use a shorter, wider kick (Colwin 26). The arm cycle starts with the arms pulled tightly together above the facedown head then pulls to the side of the body (Tarpinian 59). As the hands reach the chest, they should start to come together and the upper body should start to lift out of the water (Tarpinian 59). The elbows should follow the hands, but not touch, while the head should be out of the water so the swimmer is able to take a breath; then the end of pull comes as the hands shoot out into a streamline position, or the starting position (Tarpinian 59). The frog kick starts with the legs tightly pulled together straight out behind the body (Tarpinian 59). Then the legs will come up to the butt with the knees still together, and the feet will be the first to digress from the position (Tarpinian 59). The legs will then take a circular motion around as the inner muscles of the thighs will pull the legs close again, thus allowing the legs to return to the starting position (Tarpinian 59). Timing, however, is everything in this stroke to allow the to achieve top speeds. "The closing of the legs should occur as the arms are going into recovery, so that the body shoots forward on the momentum imparted by the kick" (Colwin 26). To achieve speed, the breaststroke has to be streamlined but powerful at the same time; as this also introduces its complexity (Colwin 27). To increase the speed, the shoulders must almost touch the ears, the arms must be under the body with a downward pull, and the back needs to almost be hollowed out when the swimmer takes a breath and follows into recovery (Colwin 68).

The butterfly is the last stroke of the four strokes. It is said to be the most difficult and exhausting stroke to perform ("Swimming" Columbia). There are two dolphin kicks for every arm cycle (Colwin 58). The arm cycle of the butterfly is exactly the same as the freestyle except that they occur simultaneously with each other, so there is no shoulder extension or body rotation (Tarpinian 70). As hands come out of the water to start the recovery, the legs should be straight and at a downward angle to help the upper body to come out of the water (Tarpinian 70) As the hands end the recovery by entering the water, the butt should be rising and the knees should be bending (Tarpinian 72). Breathing takes place as the upper body rises out of the water and then the head drops quickly deep into the water as the hands follow (Tarpinian 73). The first kick occurs as the head is down the butt is up, and the legs are getting ready to kick again (Tarpinian 73). Then, as the head returns to streamline, the kick takes place (Colwin 59). Essentially, the body should follow the head in a snake-like manner.

Each stroke has its own start and flip turn, but most amateur swimmers don't do starts and just use the open turn for all the strokes, which is only supposed to be used for the butterfly and breaststroke (Colwin 71). Both hands must touch the wall; then as the swimmer brings his feet to the wall, drops one arm into the water, rotates his body and pushes-off the wall, thus entering into a streamline position (Colwin 71). The flip turn incorporates gymnastics as the swimmer approaches the wall, tucks into a somersault, dolphin kicks, makes the rotation, and pushes off the wall underwater on his back in a streamline position ("Swimming" MedicineNet). In freestyle, as the swimmer is gliding to the surface, he rotates to his stomach and dolphin kicks to the surface to begin the stroke again ("Swimming" MedicineNet). In backstroke, the swimmer just stays on his back ("Swimming" MedicineNet). The butterfly, breaststroke and freestyle have the same start. Toes are at the edge of the block and hands are down placed against the edge on either side of the feet, getting ready to push off (Colwin 70). The swimmer pulls the body downward until the heels lift, then the arms are thrown forward, the legs extend vigorously and the body is fully extended like a trajectory resulting in the perfect dive (Colwin 70). The backstroke start begins in the water. The swimmer faces the block, grasps the handles of the block and puts his feet on the wall with his knees by his chest (Colwin 65). The push-off takes the swimmer back into an arch out of the water and the arms come around into a back dive (Colwin 65). All in all, "Swimming calls more muscles into play with exact coordination than most other sports, and its high repetition of movement makes it extremely beneficial to the cardiovascular system" ("Swimming" Columbia).

Swimming even has remedial qualities too. Swimming can be performed by any age group or classification of people. Doctors actually prescribe swimming to arthritic patients and post knee surgery patients because of the low impact on the joints ("Swimming" MedicineNet). The reason why swimming is so great for the disabled, the young and the broken is because the water is an equalizer ("Swimming" MedicineNet). Water supports the body weight and with any type of floatation device, swimming is virtually possible for anyone, even those in wheelchairs as evidenced by the Special Olympics ("Swimming" MedicineNet). It allows athletes of other sports to recover from their injuries while still staying in shape (Tarpinian 5). Swimming also allows one to enter into a meditative, relaxing mindset escaping stress as swimming blocks everything out except the flow and feel of the water (Tarpinian 6).

Swimming has long been imbedded into human history for different reasons. In the beginning, it was necessary for those settlements living next to water. It evolved into military training. Continuing to develop, swimming became a part of the upper-class' leisure activities. Now it incorporates all of these reasons plus a lifestyle. In the future, swimming will continue to imbed itself into the history of mankind.

Bibliography

Colwin, Cecil M. Breakthrough Swimming. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2002.

"Swimming." MedicineNet. 2020. 17 Feb. 2020 .

"Swimming." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. New York: Columbia University Press, 2001-07. 17 Feb 2020 .

Tarpinian, Steve. The Essential Swimmer. New York, NY: The Lyons Press, 1996.

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